Omicron has taken over Covid-19 talks on TV


At the same time that the omicron quickly surpassed the delta into a major Covid-19 problem in the US and many other countries, it also aired on television.

People are writing more about the omicron variation than they are writing about the delta change over time, according to a special report by Recode compiled by state-owned media company Zignal Labs.

Compared to the delta, omicron was mentioned nearly six times on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Reddit in the three weeks after each problem was first identified by WHO and named as a variety of concerns. In the three weeks after each case was identified by the CDC as another problem (which came later than the WHO), omicron was mentioned 2.2 times more often on the same media.

“People are talking more, and more actively, about the omicron than they do in the delta,” said Jennifer Granston, chief customer and head of lighting at Zignal Labs. “It really happened, very quickly.”

There are also signs that people are not only sending more but looking for more omicron than the delta. On Google, the number of “omicron” searches exceeded the “delta” peak earlier this year by about 1.5 times, according to Google Trends.

A photo showing the popularity of Google’s delta search against omicron over time.
Google Trends

Social researchers have provided possible explanations for this: The virus is spreading faster than the delta river, which means more people are turning to social networking sites to ask questions and share their concerns; and people are more open about Covid-19 than they were before the epidemic, so they are sharing their test results online.

Omicron also makes it a point to discuss as much as “as they see fit,” says Amanda Brennan, chief executive of the digital television group XX Artists and. formerly a “writer” on Tumblr.

Brennan described the spread of the “defeatist vibe” genre and the “tremendous disease” in the omicron-inspired memes “as deep as the delta was.” As people are fed by the constant appearance of the transmission cycle; they may also be prepared to joke about it as the virus sounds better.

Then there is the New York media effect.

Since the end of November when the omicron began to worry, about 2 percent of all tweets related to the change were directed to New York, according to Zignal Labs. The proliferation of journalists, promoters, and other media outlets with large numbers of followers writing about the genre has helped omicron find the moniker “media diversity. ” Many New Yorkers on social media have posted pictures that have been shown to people formed a line around the city blocks to test Covid-19, or TikTok in addition to images from their categories showing friends warning each other about their Covid-19 being played by pop music.

Although in New York there was hype, most of the tweets shared by the omicron so far did not originate in New York City, but outside the US, according to Zignal. Very shared The tweet from December 17, according to Zignal, was posted in Thai, warning people to take omicron seriously.

Overall, the omicron’s broad and original communication on the media can be both positive and negative. On the other hand, initial conversations about the omicron can serve as a warning to people to be careful as this highly contagious species begins to spread.

But the advent of social networking can also provide an opportunity for you to discover the lies about the transition, so to speak. recurring problems since the epidemic began in early 2020.

“One of the things we like to try to keep a close eye on is what is being pursued or goals being promoted because when you have big conversations with a lot of eyes, it is easier for people to write a message,” says Zignal Labs’ Granston.

As we end 2021 we face the new omicron waves, in many ways it feels like we are back for the 2020 holidays. a new revolution.

The article was first published in the newspaper Recode. Sign in here so don’t miss the next one!

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