A Year in the Flood


For at least a hundred years, about two, gymnastics around the world have been obsessed with the concept of “high” and “low” culture: poetry and pop music, ballet and B films, opera against a TV show in which people are forced to marry other people. I just met. Dichotomies are inexhaustible, and while there has been (a crucial) push back against abusive speech in recent years, there is also the issue of a third-party group with no continuity between high and low: “flooding” culture.

It is impossible to compare the amount of things that are being made, modified, and put online today. The inner cup is empty, and much of what is in it is strange and wonderful: a woman pour oil on his head and use a swing throwing her body to wear a wedding dress, a dad sees his silhouette in a mattress to have sex. Although these videos have over 100 million views each (and one requires more money and more time), no one talks about them – why? What to say? We ignore the madness and instability of the content machine because it often looks like a flash of one minute in front of our eye before the touch of our finger.

Writing culture, by definition, has to analyze some kind of culture, and these videos are not culture, not really – and content. While journalists around the world are displaying digital technology, and sometimes sometimes what is left of the machine is strange or big enough to make more people publicize (think. Elsagate, or 5-Minute Crafts’ “Bigger than before” egg), we strongly ignore social norms; we have become accustomed to confusing. But sometimes we need to stop and analyze. For the benefit of future historians, here is a look back at some of the things that attracted eye witnesses, if not the most, in 2021.

Ever since the birth of pizza, with the advent of pizza cutting tools, people have been asking a proud, burning, boring question: Who cuts pizza, boys or girls? In this 35-second stolen TikTok uploaded to the YouTube VS video (sadly, in other words, the original TikToker is not mentioned), two “girl” and “boy” cutting of Margherita pizza are set aside. The more expensive methods shown are the same; no unpleasant odor; the movie just ends.

Although YouTube video has more than 50 million views (7 million more than the most recent videos uploaded to Justin Bieber channel), the question of whether gender and wholesome pizza maker still exists, unfortunately, has not been answered. Or maybe this was a systematic illustration, designed to show the folly of male or female ideas. After all, shouldn’t husband and wife share equally?

It’s not like a YouTube video of a father hiding inside a man-made hole in a mattress, covering himself with a blanket, and surprising his girlfriend (maybe-in-a-joke) no fun — what would it be like, when we all have so much day and nothing to satisfy? The content of the video is intriguing: Were the new mattresses purchased specifically for the 58-second clip? How did the owners of Woody & Kleiny YouTube video cut a mattress so neat? Has anyone been hired to do the job?

The questions continue. How was the mattress discarded later? How does the stupid one justify such abusive rubbish? Was it worth it? Was it worth it? Was it worth it, in the end?

Despite the increased homogenization of the internet, The content on Facebook remains very different. To be honest: This July on social media was a video in which a man named Adley bent down in front of a camera and poured oil on his neck and said, “This is my last resort, because I can’t take revenge” on. the wedding dress is held in front of her by an unknown couple. After Pam’s hair spray has been applied liberally to lacy items, our heroine moves herself in front of the swing set and jumps into a dress she could have had inside without the lotion or children’s playground.

The CCTV video fake is huge on Facebook, as well as videos showing men walking around with their wives cheating. The video, uploaded by the Facebook Sarcasm page, under the iconic Chandler Bing logo, features heavy metal and covered with large red circles and bright yellow letters. Although the movie has a staggering 410 million views, no one in the commentary seems to believe it to be true – perhaps because the man with whom the “woman” is cheating chooses to hide in a bed next to a double bed (why he doesn’t mind hiding it inside mattress?). Facebook sites like these always come up with objections, and Sarcasm states: “Note: All the videos on this page are just for fun. All the characters, events, and ideas are fiction. They are just fiction and should not be tried in real life.” You have been warned.

Combining ASMR’s fun with the traditional delicacy of a cooked piece is not uncommon, but this 4, 20-second video is interrupted by its emphasis on squeezing and whipping the raw chicken. Unlike aroused food videos on the Internet, This Mystery is stable and uncluttered (and a list of ingredients is included in the video description!). However, squelching is not something you would think is acceptable to the directors of a TV cooking show, even if it flies on the YouTube account Lieblingsrezepte (“your favorite recipes”). Things only get worse in the recently released video, “If you cook chicken like this you will be amazed at the results!“(Spoiler: hair dryer is included.)

A woman and a girl are sitting at a table, each with a plate in front of them filled with cut-throat dogs with pasta; the woman tells the girl to bring her a drink, and when the baby is gone, she steals hot dog parts from the girl’s bowl. You — and 224 million other viewers — may think you have a grudge against his greedy influence, but wait! The woman then swaps the bowl so that the girl has a hot dog more than she is — a favorite. But wait! The woman is now digging in a pasta bowl in front of her to expose two uncircumcised hot dogs lurking inside. It is impossible to write a final sentence, because there is no final word. The contents simply disappear. Another video follows.


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