US Puts $ 10M Bounty on DarkSide Ransomware Hackers


Friday, a the most visible DDoSecrets group has been released hundreds of hours of photographs of police helicopters. It is not known who found the findings, or what made the man so, but the trove shows how law enforcement looked, and how reliable his cameras were. Proponents of her case have been working to make the actual transcript of this statement available online.

In other news items: For the first time, law enforcement officials say, a consumers may have tried to disrupt the US power grid. The July 2020 event took place at a power plant in Pennsylvania; The DJI Mavic 2 quadcopter with nylon cords and copper wire looks sure to start a short circuit, but it crashed on a nearby roof before it was too late. Security experts have been warning about this for years, and law enforcement agencies say they have not moved swiftly to reduce the risk.

This week he saw China’s new data privacy law is starting to work, and the results are already playing out. Yahoo! came out of the country, referring to “the most difficult places for business and law.” And while these laws are some of the strongest in the world, the fact that the Chinese are bound by national security — and they continue to give themselves the opportunity to learn more about its citizens — could encourage other nations to take similar action.

Cryptocurrency scammers took advantage of Netflix’s hit reputation Squid game to increase interest rates, he then withdrew money from depositors up to $ 3 million. The White House Market black website closed earlier this month, but he upgraded security measures in a short period of time. And if you have it iCloud +, here’s how to take advantage of the new security features you can now enter.

Lastly, make sure you set aside a few minutes this weekend to get into this story a group of foster parents built their own open source program for their school system—Only for the city to call the police.

And there is more! Each week we report all WIRED security issues that are not detailed. Click on the headlines to read all the articles, and stay safe out there.

The DarkSide ransomware group he spent a year or more in one of the most insidious gangs, which reached its climax. attack on the Colonial Pipeline which led to temporary gas shortages in the East Coast region. They darkened soon after, probably out of sheer curiosity, but apparently they reappeared as a group that called himself BlackMatter soon. To date, the U.S. State Department has awarded a $ 10 million reward for anyone with information that will help them identify or obtain DarkSide leadership, as well as up to $ 5 million for guidance leading to DarkSide’s arrest or prosecution. There are there is no simple ransomware solution, but placing too much emphasis on wrongdoers is only the beginning.

Another way to deal with hackers? Dox them! This is how Ukraine took this week, bringing out a few members of the Russian Gamaredon group and connecting them with the FSB intelligence team in the country. In addition to sharing the names of the conspirators, Ukrainian authorities have also issued telephones to discuss the conspiracy and to complain about their salaries. Ukraine’s Ministry of Defense says Gamaredon has committed more than 5,000 crimes against the government’s demands of 1,500 since 2013.

A busy week forcing the government! The U.S. this week added four cybersecurity-related companies to the Entity List, which appears to be involved in “acts of insecurity or foreign interests in the United States.” The NSO group is the most popular name; spy software company Pegasus malware is said to be used against media, critics, and human rights activists around the world. The Israeli company Candiru was also accused. The Russian security company cybersecurity Positive Technologies also appeared on the list; it had has already been approved in support of its intelligence operations, a lawsuit filed in the Singapore-based Computer Security Initiative Consultancy PTE.

Researchers in Cambridge this week revealed an error in the Unicode section that affects most code-compliant users, which means it also affects all codes. A recent concern is that the error can be exploited in a supply chain attack, setting the threshold a kind of foundation that provides power over many applications. Some organizations have already pushed patches, but we all know how it works.


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