United Nations Completes By Completing New Space Laws


There is a global consensus on creating unconstitutional atmosphere-related conditions rather than on rigid ideas focused on other technologies, says Samson. He said he was “very pleased” that the UN was escaping its crisis in airstrikes.

Many countries has already published answers to the UN’s decision, especially in support of it. Non-governmental organizations, including the Samson’s Secure World Foundation, armed groups, and even the International Committee of the Red Cross, have done the same. The latter points out that “the use of weapons in space … could have a profound effect on ordinary people around the world.” If, say, a satellite that relies on weather, communications, or navigation was turned off during a global dispute, it could have serious consequences.

That is the problem with “dual-use” technology, says Samson, referring to airplanes that can be used for military and civilian use. For example, while some military communications include dedicated satellites, 80 percent of those messages use commercial satellite satellites, which may be considered target targets. (Astronomers were not asked to comment directly, as private companies are governed by their own national policies, not international ones. Representatives of American aerospace companies often participate in US delegations.)

The dangers of atmospheric debris, which can be caused by orbital collisions or attacks, continue to attract attention, especially considering the amount of debris generated by satanic tests, such as those China in 2007 and India in 2019. Even the tiny flotsam particles can be harmful, because they move too fast. Bruce McClintock, director of the Space Enterprise Initiative at Rand Corporation, a financially and military-funded research center in Santa Monica, California, says that, on Earth, hurricanes can force pieces of grass into mobile phones. “Now imagine that you are at orbital speed, and you have something as big as a paint chip traveling thousands of miles an hour. These are things that can seriously damage satellites, “he says.

That is the main reason why Aaron Boley, a planetary scientist and founder of the Outer Space Institute in Vancouver, British Columbia, wants to stop testing weapons that could damage satellites. “Prohibiting attempts to create anti-satanic garbage is an area that I think could be a major alliance,” he says. His Institute published open letter on September 2 filing a lawsuit against such, with signatories from several countries. Prohibiting tests that produce “long-term waste” – shrapnel that has been around for years instead of falling and burning in the air – could be a welcome opportunity, McClintock argues, even though he listens to the controversy. letter from the Outer Space Institute.

To avoid collisions or attacks between satellites, which can also cause litter, experts often cite this Marine Events The treaty between the United States and the former Soviet Union, which was signed in 1972. The treaty required that the two countries communicate closely and that other ships, including their missiles, be at ease. “It did not change the size and structure of the navy, but it did bring about rules for informing athletes,” says Jessica West, senior researcher at Project Plowshares, based in Waterloo, Ontario. Provide satellite owners prior to the warning and request permission to arrive they can go to great lengths, “not to panic, worry, or respond to your efforts, just to stay active,” he says.



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