Japan escalates the crisis as Delta cases rise | Coronavirus News Plague


At least eight other areas have been added to the emergency plan, with a total turnaround to 21 regions, where the country suddenly appears in crisis.

Japan is expanding the emergency to eight more regions, bringing the total to 21, in order to reduce the spread of coronavirus, the Minister for Anti-Coalization COVID-19 announced Wednesday.

So far the government has imposed 13 states on 47 of Japan’s territories, including the capital, Tokyo, which were abruptly banned by September 12 to deal with the rising Delta cases that have forced the medical system.

“Serious cases have grown abruptly and medical care is in dire straits,” Finance Minister Yasutoshi Nishimura said at the beginning of a meeting with a group of advisers, whose approval required the implementation of the plan.

The government intends to set up borders in Hokkaido, Aichi, Hiroshima and five other areas leading to the Japanese islands from August 27 to September 12, he said.

It also wants to add four more areas to a few “emergencies”, he said.

Japanese bans have been much more lenient than barriers in other countries and have been imposed on dietary restrictions to ban bans in exchange for money. There are also requests for companies to have more employees from home.

On Tuesday, the country reported 21,500 new daily COVID-19 cases and 42 deaths in the second country, according to the Ministry of Health.

Nationwide the total number of cases reached 1.34 million, with more than 15,700 people and almost 2,000 serious cases.

The death toll in Japan represents approximately 1.2%, compared with 1.7% in the United States and 2.0% in Britain.

But about 90% of Tokyo’s hospice beds seem to be on the rise with serious cases, forcing many people to recover at home, some dying before they can get treatment.

NHK, a public publisher in Japan, estimates that some 25,000 patients are recovering at home due to bed bugs.



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